Support local. Eat fresh, healthy food. Enjoy an outing and sunshine. All of this and more can be achieved this summer at the various farmers markets in the Fraser Valley!


Abbotsford Farm & Country Market—Saturdays 9-12 from May 7 to October 29


Downtown Chilliwack Community Market—Sundays 10-2 from May 29 to September 18


The Eco Market—Wednesdays 4-8 from May 4 to August 31


Mission City Farmers Market—Saturdays 9-1 from May 7 to October 8


Agassiz Farm Fresh Market—Thursdays 4-7 from June 23 to September 1

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This summer, you can enjoy healthy food, fresh air, and supporting local all in one go! Check out the list of farmers markets happening in Vancouver this summer.


Downtown Farmers Market—Wednesdays 2-6 from June 1 to October 5


False Creek Farmers Market—Thursdays 3-7 from July 14 to October 6


Kitsilano Farmers Market—Sundays 10-2 from May 1 to October 30


Mount Pleasant Farmers Market—Sundays 10-2 from May 22 to October 30


Riley Park Farmers Market—Saturdays 10-2 from April 23 to October 29


Trout Lake Farmers Market—Saturdays 10-2 from June 4 to November 26


West End Farmers Market—Saturdays 9-2 from May 22 to October 29


Granville Island Farmers Market


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The deadline to apply for the BC Home Owner Grant is coming up on July 4, 2022! Here are some things you need to know when applying.

What is the Home Owner Grant?

The home owner grant reduces the amount of property tax you pay for your principal residence.

The grant is available to homeowners who pay property taxes to a municipality, or to the province if they live in a rural area. If you pay your property taxes to a First Nation, contact the First Nation directly.

Most eligible property owners qualify for the regular grant (also called the basic grant). 

On top of the regular grant, you may qualify for an additional grant if you are:
The regular grant amount is $570 for properties located in the Capital Regional District, the Metro Vancouver Regional District and the Fraser Valley Regional District. For all other areas of the province the amount is $770.

If your property is assessed below the threshold and you meet certain requirements, you will receive the full regular grant amount. Properties assessed over the threshold may receive a partial grant (learn about the grant threshold).

Property owners must pay at least $350 in property taxes to help fund services such as road maintenance and police protection. This amount may be less if you qualify for the home owner grant as a senior, veteran or person with a disability. Your grant amount may be adjusted to ensure the minimum amount of annual taxes are paid. 

Who Is Eligible for the Grant?

To qualify for the grant:
You must
  • Be the registered owner of the residence (or a spouse or relative of the deceased owner)
  • Be a Canadian citizen or permanent resident of Canada
  • Live in B.C.
  • Occupy the residence as your principal residence

The assessed or partitioned value of your property must not exceed the grant threshold

If you are buying or selling your property, ensure you meet all requirements before claiming the home owner grant. 

How Do I Apply?

It’s easy! Simply click HERE and walk through the instructions to apply for the home owner grant.

Application Deadline

Property Taxes are always due the first business day of July. 2022 Property Taxes are due on Monday, July 4, 2022. Which also means applications for the BC Home Owner Grant are also due by July 4, 2022.

Property owners who haven’t received a tax notice should contact their municipal finance department.

New property owners who don’t receive a tax notice, or received a tax notice with the previous owners’ name(s) on it, should:
  • contact the BC Land Title and Survey Authority at 604-630-9630 for a Certificate of Title to prove ownership; and
  • complete the Home Owner Grant application available online in most municipalities.
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Market Update for Metro & Greater Vancouver

“Spring ushers in calmer housing market trends in Metro Vancouver,” says REBGV.

After reaching record-setting levels in 2021, home sale activity has returned to more typical seasonal levels in Metro Vancouver this spring due, in large part, to rising interest rates.
 
The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 2,918 in May 2022, a 31.6 per cent decrease from the 4,268 sales recorded in May 2021, and a 9.7 per cent decrease from the 3,232 homes sold in April 2022.

“With interest rates rising, home buyers are taking more time to make their decisions in today’s housing market,” said Daniel John, REBGV Chair. “Home buyers have been operating in a frenzied environment for much of the past two years. This spring is providing a calmer environment, with fewer multiple offer situations, which is allowing buyers to explore their housing options, understand the changing mortgage market, and do their due diligence.”

The MLS® Home Price Index* composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,261,1001. This represents a 14.7 per cent increase over May 2021 and a 0.3 per cent decrease compared to April 2022.
 
“Upward pressure on home prices has begun to ease in the housing market over the last two months,” John said. “Where home prices go next will depend on housing supply. While we’re beginning to see modest increases in home listings, we still need housing supply totals to more than double to bring the market close to balanced territory.” 

Market Indicator for Metro Vancouver 

Metro Vancouver May 2022 Market Update
To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Metro Vancouver (which includes: Downtown, Westside, Eastside, North Vancouver, West Vancouver, Richmond, Tsawwassen, and Ladner) CLICK HERE.


Market Indicator for Greater Vancouver

Greater Vancouver May 2022 Market Updater


To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Greater Vancouver (which includes: Burnaby, New Westminster, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Pitt Meadows, and Maple Ridge) CLICK HERE.


Market Update for Fraser Valley

“Home prices soften as Fraser Valley housing market cools amid lower sales and higher inventory,” says FVREB.

As property sales continue to fall in the Fraser Valley and active listings continue to grow, the region is edging towards more balanced levels not seen since the pre-pandemic period. 

Sales of all property types in May were 1,360, down 16.9 per cent from April’s 1,637; and down 53.9 per cent compared to May of 2021. 

At the same time, active listings (the number of properties available for sale at a given moment during the month, in this case at the end of May) have more than tripled since December 2021. At the end of May, actives sat at 6,183, up 5.4 per cent year-over-year, and an increase of 14.8 per cent compared to April 2022. 

“Since March, we’ve seen sales come down with an accompanying increase in inventory, subsequently restoring much-needed balance and cooling our heated market,” said Fraser Valley Real Estate Board President, Sandra Benz. “While still early, it suggests that as we gradually settle into a post-pandemic state of work and life, the big pandemic-era drivers – working from home and record low interest rates – may have run their course.” 

In May, MLS® HPI Benchmark prices for all three main property types decreased month-over-month for the first time since September 2019. 

“The softening of prices will be welcome news for homebuyers, especially in the face of rising mortgage rates,” said Fraser Valley Real Estate Board CEO, Baldev Gill. “The volatility we’ve witnessed over the past couple of years not only underscores the power of external events to affect the market but, in light of recent trends, the ability of the market itself, to adapt and trigger corrective mechanisms.”

Market Indicator for Fraser ValleFraser Valley May 2022 Market Updatey


To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Fraser Valley (which includes: Surrey, South Surrey, White Rock, North Delta, Cloverdale, Langley, Abbotsford, and Mission) CLICK HERE.




Curious how the market is doing in your city? Whether you're looking to buy, sell, or invest in Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Surrey, Langley, or Abbotsford, these Lower Mainland market update statistics will give you insight into the Vancouver and Fraser Valley real estate markets.


If you'd like more details about your specific market, please send us an email, we'd love to chat more. You can also fill out the Home Evaluation form here.

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The Bank of Canada raised its benchmark interest rate to 1.5 per cent on Wednesday, June 1, 2022—the biggest increase in over two decades—and signalled that more hikes are on the way.


But how exactly does this rate increase affect real estate in Canada? What does it mean for home buyers and sellers right now?


There are varying opinions as to whether the Bank of Canada’s decision to increase interest rates could result in a correction in the red-hot housing market. Indeed, one of the contributing factors to the exceptional growth in the Canadian housing market has been very low interest rates, giving borrowers more purchasing power and enabling them to compete in fierce bidding wars for residential properties. But that has been shifting as the era of cheap money is coming to an end.


​​Borrowers gravitated to variable-rate mortgages because they were lower but the Bank of Canada’s hiking campaign will soon make variable rates more expensive too.


Nathan Janzen, an economist with RBC, thinks Canada's central bank is on track for a series of larger-than-normal hikes in a row, until its rate gets to roughly three per cent. Canada's benchmark interest rate hasn't hit that level since the 2008 financial crisis. 

"The looming question is whether rates need to rise above that neutral range to get inflation back under control," Janzen said.


Where does that leave buyers looking to purchase a home right now?

Those looking to buy a home may find things getting worse for the next couple of months before they get better as some buyers look to lock in lower rates from pre-approvals.


Asked about the rate hike, federal Finance Minister Chrystia Freeland said financial controls are in place to make sure mortgages don't go underwater. “We have stress tests designed to be sure anyone taking out a mortgage could get through a period of higher interest rates.”


The rate increase is now pushing up the mortgage stress test’s qualifying rate, removing stretched-out buyers from the market. But even those who still qualify for a mortgage will see higher rates reduce the size of the mortgage they can get—and the price they can pay. For households earning the median income, for example, the rise in fixed mortgage rates will shrink the maximum purchase budget by roughly 15%. 


How does this increase affect sellers?

The national average house price has fallen for two months in a row and is said that it’s expected to fall further—a concerning factor for sellers though potentially good news for buyers. 


Owners that banked on the fact that they would be making a huge profit when selling their homes are having to adjust their expectations downward, but even those with no plans to sell are feeling the pinch. Many of these owners purchased their home years ago when mortgage rates of two per cent were easy to find. Today, those mortgages are up for renewal, and the interest rates are in the four per cent range, which could result in them no longer being able to afford the mortgage. They will have to stretch their mortgages over a longer time period to bring the monthly payment down to something more affordable


Despite all the prognostications and expectations that Canadian real estate market prices could ease this year because of interest rates, many forecasts suggest that home valuations will either balance out or continue their upward trajectory for the next few months.


But it’s not all doom and gloom. 

Rather than pose a major threat, rising interest rates are likely to bring welcome changes to the market—including more sustainable activity, fewer price wars, more balanced conditions, and modest price relief for buyers. After the extreme price increases and heated bidding wars of the last year, this would be a positive shift.


With over 18 years of experience as a real estate agent, I am confident that your home buying or selling needs can be met. It takes patience, understanding, creativity, and skillful application of knowledge and resources, but it can be done.


If you have any questions about how this interest rate increase might affect your home buying/selling, please feel free to contact me. 

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Market Update for Metro & Greater Vancouver


“Metro Vancouver home sales return to more traditional levels in April,” says REBGV.


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 3,232 in April 2022, a 34.1 per cent decrease from the 4,908 sales recorded in April 2021, and a 25.6 per cent decrease from the 4,344 homes sold in March 2022.


“So far this spring, we’ve seen home sales ease down from the record-breaking pace of the last year,” Daniel John, REBGV Chair said. “While a small sample size, the return to a more traditional pace of home sales that we’ve experienced over the last two months provides hopeful home buyers more time to make decisions, secure financing and perform other due diligence such as home inspections.


“With interest rates climbing and the total inventory of homes for sale inching higher, it’s important to work with your local Realtor to understand how these factors could affect your home buying or selling situation,” John said. 

For all property types, the sales-to-active listings ratio for April 2022 is 36.7 per cent. By property type, the ratio is 25.3 per cent for detached homes, 47.1 per cent for townhomes, and 45 per cent for apartments. 


Generally, analysts say downward pressure on home prices occurs when the ratio dips below 12 per cent for a sustained period, while home prices often experience upward pressure when it surpasses 20 per cent over several months.


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,374,500. This represents an 18.9 per cent increase over April 2021 and a one per cent increase compared to March 2022.


Fraser Valley Market Update

Market Update for Fraser Valley

“Fraser Valley sales dip below 10-year average for first time in nearly two years,” says FVREB.


Property sales in the Fraser Valley decreased by over 35 per cent in April 2022 compared to the previous month, and while the figure is still the sixth-highest April on record for the past ten years, it marks the first time monthly sales have fallen below the ten-year average since June 2020.


In April, the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) processed 1,637 sales on its Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®), a decrease of 45.7 per cent compared to April 2021 and a 36.6 per cent decrease compared to March.


“We would typically see a flurry of activity around this time of the year,” said, FVREB President, Sandra Benz, “however that’s not been the case so far. While it’s still too early to say whether this trend will endure, the slowing of sales combined with an increase in active listings is helping to restore a semblance of balance to the market, which is encouraging for homebuyers.”


Last month, the Board received 3,622 new listings, a decrease of 27.8 per cent compared to April 2021, and a decrease of 20.9 per cent compared to March 2022. The total month-end active inventory in April was 5,387, 14.6 per cent higher than in March.


“In an effort to stem inflation worries, the government has moved quickly to implement interest rate hikes,” added FVREB CEO Baldev Gill. “In fact, we’re already back to rate levels we haven’t seen since 2019. This will put an added burden on homebuyers, particularly on first-timers, who will have to meet more stringent stress test conditions. Ultimately, this will likely result in a decrease in demand, which may slow price growth, however it will do little to resolve the underlying issue of low inventory.”


Across Fraser Valley, in April, the average number of days to sell a single-family detached home was 16 and a townhome was 13 days. Apartments took, on average, 13 days to sell.



Curious how the market is doing in your city? Whether you're looking to buy, sell, or invest in Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Surrey, Langley, or Abbotsford, these Lower Mainland market update statistics will give you insight into the Vancouver and Fraser Valley real estate markets.


If you'd like more details about your specific market, please send us an email, we'd love to chat more. You can also fill out the Home Evaluation form here.


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Being a first-time homebuyer in today’s market feels a bit like being picked last for your elementary school dodgeball team. That sinking feeling of “When will my name be picked? “When is it my turn?” With the prices as high as they are in the housing market right now, is it even possible to get into the market? Can young adults realistically purchase a home?


The short answer is yes. But how? When the average price of a detached home is over 1 million dollars, how are first-time homebuyers supposed to dip their toes into the market, let alone go all in?


You need to be realistic and set yourself up for success. No, you might not be able to afford a detached home right off the bat, but there are other options, like condos.


Condo prices don’t typically increase at the same rate as detached homes. They’re a great way to get your foot in the real estate door and the likelihood of being approved for a mortgage for that amount is very plausible. 


Here are a few tips:


  • Get pre-approved through a mortgage broker or mortgage provider that works regularly with your Realtor® or is recommended by them. This is the most important step.

  • Work with a Realtor® that will create a personal property website tailored specifically to your exact needs.

  • If there is a possibility of multiple offers on a property, find out when the seller is reviewing offers and have a pre-inspection prior to this date so you are familiar with the property’s condition and don’t need to include an inspection as a subject condition.

  • Also, find out any other terms that would be important to the seller, such as closing date and which day they would like to hand over the keys.

  • First-time home buyers usually get into the market by purchasing a condo or townhouse. This means there will often be hundreds of pages of strata documents to review. Make sure you know what to look for and that your Realtor® is familiar with strata bylaws and common points to look out for. Carefully review the restrictions mentioned in the bylaws. Also, review the depreciation report so that you know what improvements are upcoming and whether or not there is enough money in the contingency reserve fund. If there isn’t enough saved, the owners will have to pay for the improvements with special levies.


Be encouraged—there are ways to buy in this market, even with prices as high as they are. All of my clients have been successful with purchasing a home because they didn’t try to time it with the market. Again, start by finding an experienced Realtor® who knows the ins and outs of the real estate market you’re looking to purchase in. Then, qualify for a mortgage. My clients have been able to purchase as soon as they were able to qualify for a mortgage, for as little as 5% for a down payment.


That could be you!

Fill out the contact form on my website or give me a call if you'd like to hear more about your options.
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If a bathroom renovation is on your to-do list this spring, give a quick read of the post "In the Bath, First-Time Buyers Really Want Both a Shower & Tub," from NAHB's Eye on Housing. It shows the bathroom features important to first-time buyers.


The information comes from the National Association of Home Builders’ (NAHB) study, “What Home Buyers Really Want, 2021 Edition.” In it, NAHB asked first-time and repeat home buyers to rate bathroom features on a four-tier scale to measure how much a given feature would influence their purchase decision.
 
The study asked homebuyers to put each feature in one of 4 categories: Essential, Desirable, Indifferent, and Do Not Want. 
 
Essential meant that someone was unlikely to buy a home without the feature and Desirable meant that someone was seriously influenced to buy a home if the feature was included. 
 
Topping the list is a bathroom with both a shower stall and a tub in the primary bathroom, with 72 per cent of first-time buyers rating that feature combination essential or desirable. In second place, 70 per cent of first-time home buyers said having a linen closet in the primary bathroom was essential or desirable. These also ranked as the two most popular bathroom features among repeat buyers, but in reverse order (with 77 percent of repeat buyers rating the linen closet essential or desirable, compared to 72 percent for the shower stall-tub combination).
 



There are a few other simple updates you can make to your bathroom before you sell to attract more buyers, as well. For instance, a neutral ambiance is key, especially in the master bathroom. That is one of the rooms in a house that acts as a retreat for many. A place to lock the door and step away from it all for a moment. Give your master bathroom a spa-like vibe by painting it a neutral colour. White is a great choice as it keeps the space bright. Add a few plants, too, for a warm, welcoming atmosphere.

People typically have more showers than baths so home buyers prefer bigger showers with added features like multiple shower heads, built-in seats, and frameless glass enclosures. Steam showers have also become an extremely hot commodity. A steam shower offers many options like aromatherapy, rain-like overhead shower, foot massage, music, phone connection, overhead LED lights, body jets and steam showers. Bathtubs are still desirable but freestanding soaker tubs are more popular than the built-in tubs with jets.

And finally, replace the faucets, fixtures, and lighting in all your bathrooms with something modern to give them a refreshing look. It’s often the smallest updates that make the biggest difference to potential home buyers.


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On April 7, 2022, Canada's Minister of Finance Chrystia Freeland revealed the 2022 Federal Budget. Recognizing that Canada has a significant housing shortage, the Budget has a large emphasis on reconciling the supply and affordability of housing in Canada.


Budget 2022 includes billions of dollars in new spending to put toward housing affordability over the coming five years. This comes at a critical time for many Canadians who have been priced out of real estate markets due to skyrocketing price tags amid lower interest rates.


“We will invest in building more homes and in bringing down the barriers that keep them from being built. We will invest in the rental housing that so many count on. We will make it easier for our young people to get those first keys of their own,” Freeland said. “In putting together this budget, we were very mindful of elevated inflationary pressure,” noting this is one that “focuses on expanding the supply side of the economy.”


Included in the 2022 Budget are the following real estate related measures:


  1. Two-Year Ban on Foreign Homebuyers. The Budget contemplates new rules to prohibit foreign commercial enterprises and individuals who are not Canadian citizens or permanent residents from acquiring residential property in Canada for two years. Notably, refugees, foreign workers, and international students on the path to permanent residency are expected to be exempt.


  1. First Time Homebuyers Incentives. The Budget introduces a Tax-Free First Home Savings Account that will allow first-time homebuyers to contribute up to a maximum of $40,000. Contributions to this account would be tax-deductible like an RRSP, while withdrawals to buy a home would be non-taxable like a TFSA. In addition, the Budget doubles the existing First-Time Home Buyers’ Tax Credit (from $5,000 to $10,000).


  1. CMHC and Co-Operative Housing Funding. The Budget provides $4 billion over five years to the Canada Mortgage and Housing Corporation (“CMHC”) to establish a new Housing Accelerator Fund. The purpose of this Fund is to speed up the planning and delivery of housing in municipalities and aims to create 100,000 new housing units over the next five years. In addition, the Budget provides $1.5 billion over two years to expand CMHC’s existing Rapid Housing Initiative, which is expected to allow the construction of at least 6,000 new affordable housing units. Lastly, the Budget provides for an additional $1 billion in loans to support co-operative housing projects.


  1. Anti-Flipping. The Budget contemplates new rules requiring any person who sells residential property they have held for less than 12 months to be subject to full taxation on their profits (i.e. as business income). This will apply to residential properties sold on or after January 1, 2023. Notably, exemptions would apply for Canadians who sell their home due to certain life circumstances e.g. death, disability, the birth of a child, a new job, or a divorce.


If you have any questions as to how these measures can help you sell or purchase a home, please don’t hesitate to contact me.


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Market Update for Metro & Greater Vancouver

“Calmer than last spring’s record pace, Metro Vancouver home buyer demand remains elevated,” says REBGV.


While down from last year’s record numbers, home sale activity in Metro Vancouver’s housing market remained elevated in March. The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 4,344 in March 2022, a 23.9 per cent decrease from the 5,708 sales recorded in March 2021, and a 26.9 per cent increase from the 3,424 homes sold in February 2022.


“March of 2021 was the highest selling month in our history. This year’s activity, while still elevated, is happening at a calmer pace than we experienced 12 months ago,” Daniel John, REBGV Chair said. “Home buyers are keeping a close eye on rising interest rates, hoping to make a move before their locked-in rates expire.”


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 7,628, a 16.6 per cent decrease compared to March 2021 (9,145) and a 13.1 per cent increase compared to February 2022 (6,742). 


“We’re still seeing upward pressure on prices across all housing categories in the region. Lack of supply is driving this pressure,” John said. “The number of homes listed for sale on our MLS® system today is less than half of what’s needed to shift the market into balanced territory.”


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,360,500. This represents a 20.7 per cent increase over March 2021 and a 3.6 per cent increase compared to February 2022.


Market Indicator for Metro Vancouver

Metro Vancouver March 2022 Market Update


To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Metro Vancouver (which includes: Downtown, Westside, Eastside, North Vancouver, West Vancouver, Richmond, Tsawwassen, and Ladner) CLICK HERE.


Market Indicator for Greater Vancouver

Greater Vancouver March 2022 Market Update


To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Greater Vancouver (which includes: Burnaby, New Westminster, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Pitt Meadows, and Maple Ridge) CLICK HERE.


Market Update for Fraser Valley

“Continued growth in new listings is a hopeful sign for home buyers in the Fraser Valley,” says FVREB.


For the third consecutive month, new listings in the Fraser Valley continued to climb in March giving buyers more to choose from, helping to increase overall active inventory to levels not seen since last July. Property sales remain robust, as Benchmark prices, the price of a ‘typical’ home, continued to increase month-over-month. 


Sandra Benz, President of the Board, said of this month’s statistics, “Sales were strong again in March as more new listings continued to come on stream,” said Fraser Valley Real Estate Board President, Sandra Benz. “We’re hopeful this will contribute to a slowing in price growth, which is good news for the home-buying public. Other encouraging signs, such as less open house traffic and fewer multiple offers, may help us get to a more balanced market, however until the fundamental issue of lack of supply is addressed, we won’t see that happen anytime soon.”


The Board received 4,580 new listings in March, a decrease of 10.0 per cent compared to March of last year, and 22.4 per cent more than were processed in February. Total active inventory for March was 4,699, a decrease of 6.2 per cent compared to last year’s 5,012 active listings, however 24.0 per cent higher than last month. 


Baldev Gill, Chief Executive Officer of the Board, added, “We may not see the impact of recent interest rate hikes on the market trends until later in 2022,” said CEO Baldev Gill. “With fixed rates nearly double what they were a year ago, new homebuyers will likely be more impacted than other segments of the home-buying public, as mortgage stress test conditions become more stringent. We hope to see equal efforts from government to address inventory issues to help make housing more affordable.” 


Across Fraser Valley, in March, the average number of days to sell a single-family detached home was 12 and a townhome was 14 days. Apartments took, on average, 11 days to sell. 


Market Indicator for Fraser Valley

Fraser Valley March 2022 Market Update


To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Fraser Valley (which includes: Surrey, South Surrey, White Rock, North Delta, Cloverdale, Langley, Abbotsford, and Mission) CLICK HERE.




Curious how the market is doing in your city? Whether you're looking to buy, sell, or invest in Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Surrey, Langley, or Abbotsford, these Lower Mainland market update statistics will give you insight into the Vancouver and Fraser Valley real estate markets.


If you'd like more details about your specific market, please send us an email, we'd love to chat more. You can also fill out the Home Evaluation form here.


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Spring is here, which means we’re entering the season when more homeowners want to sell their homes. But how do you help your home stand out from the rest of the homes on the real estate market? How can you attract more buyers and, ultimately, get a higher sale price than competing homes?


There are a few trends for 2022 that you should keep in mind if you’re wanting to sell your home. Some of these are simple adjustments and—such as installing new security features while others would require a bit more investment—like upgrading the siding of your house. Take them all into consideration and see what changes, however big or small, you can make to your home to increase its appeal for potential buyers.


1. Eco-Friendly Fixtures

An important factor to remember is that millennials account for the largest share of current homebuyers, according to the National Association of Realtors. Sustainable living tops the list of priorities for this generation—nearly one-third of millennials initiate or deepen their consumer investment in products or services that help the environment. This also includes the houses they choose to live in. 


- Energy-Efficient Windows: Energy-efficient windows allow less air to move through them which can help homeowners save money. Heat gain or loss from low-performance windows drives 25–30 percent of home heating and cooling costs.


- Low-Flow Water Fixtures: A simple upgrade for your home is replacing your shower head with one labeled with WaterSense as it can save four gallons of water with each shower. Do the same with your faucets to save 700 gallons per year.


- Native Landscaping: There is an increased demand for gardens with native trees and plants as they have the ability to combat biodiversity loss from climate change.


2. Wellness Areas

The pandemic has significantly impacted mental health around the world. In an effort to prioritize mental health, many Canadians are relocating to quieter, more peaceful areas, with 22 percent of city dwellers planning a move to less congested residential areas. 


However, no matter where you live, you can still intrigue buyers by jumping on this trend. At-home wellness amenities, which were once viewed as luxuries, are now on many homeowners’ must-have lists. Indoor spaces that function as a retreat for wellness and self-care have become extremely popular. 


Improve your quality of life in your home with reading nooks, spa-inspired bathrooms, and exercise or meditation spaces. Even if your house doesn’t have the square footage to section off an entire room for relaxation, making simple tweaks like allowing more natural light through the windows, setting up air purifiers, and adding indoor plants to your rooms can help you feel better in your home now while enabling future buyers to see the opportunity for their own space.


3. Calming Colours

One of the 2022 home trends that attract sellers are paint colours that produce a calming atmosphere. Soft earth tones and natural hues will prevail this year, including various shades of blue, green,  brown, and beige. Recent research suggests steering clear of trendy paint colours in favour of a more classic palette to bring the feel of nature indoors in a subtle and soothing way. 


4. Home Security Features

Consider how you can build home safety features into the design of or as an update to your home to enhance your quality of life now and attract more buyers later. For example, you could install a backup generator in the garage and/or install video cameras.


5. Designate Work Areas

It may come as no surprise that after the pandemic, 63 percent of homebuyers want their next house to have sapce for a designated office or workspace. 


If you can, consider turning a bedroom or a den into a work-from-home office. When designing the space or staging for showings, make it both functional and aesthetically pleasing. Position a desk near the window for natural light, install a bookshelf unit, arrange a few succulents on the work surface, and hang a few framed posters or a cork bulletin board on the wall. You want the space to foster productivity as well as be a place in your home you enjoy spending time. 


These are just a few ideas that, if implemented, can significantly improve the value and appeal of your home.  



Want to know how your home stands out from the rest of the listings on the market? We’d love to do a free home evaluation for you and share some tips and ideas for how you can increase your buyer-appeal. Fill out this form on our website and we’ll get in touch with you as soon as we can.


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Market Update for Metro & Greater Vancouver

“Listings inch up, demand remains steady and price gains continue in Metro Vancouver’s housing market in February,” says REBGV.

The Metro Vancouver housing market saw steady home sales activity, modest increases in home listings and continued upward trends in pricing in February. Residential home sales in the region totalled 3,424 in February 2022, an 8.1 per cent decrease from the 3,727 sales recorded in February 2021, and a 49.8 per cent increase from the 2,285 homes sold in January 2022. Last month’s sales were 26.9 per cent above the 10-year February sales average.


“As we prepare to enter what’s traditionally the busiest season of the year, the Metro Vancouver housing market is seeing more historically typical home sale activity and a modest uptick in home listing activity compared to last year,” Taylor Biggar, REBGV Chair said. “Despite having a higher volume of people listing their homes for sale in February, the region’s housing market remains significantly undersupplied, which has been pushing home prices to new highs month after month.”


The MLS® Home Price Index composite benchmark price for all residential properties in Metro Vancouver is currently $1,313,400. This represents a 20.7 per cent increase over February 2021 and a 4.6 per cent increase compared to January 2022. 


“A lack of housing supply is at the heart of the affordability challenges in Metro Vancouver today. We need more coordinated action from stakeholders at all levels to help create an ample, diverse supply of housing options for residents in the region today and into the future,” Biggar said. 


Market Indicator for Metro Vancouver

Metro Vancouver February 2022 Market Update


To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Metro Vancouver (which includes: Downtown, Westside, Eastside, North Vancouver, West Vancouver, Richmond, Tsawwassen, and Ladner) CLICK HERE.

Market Indicator for Greater Vancouver

Greater Vancouver February 2022 Market Update
To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Greater Vancouver (which includes: Burnaby, New Westminster, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Pitt Meadows, and Maple Ridge) CLICK HERE.

Market Update for Fraser Valley

“Buyers of Fraser Valley real estate had significantly more inventory to choose from last month due to a record-breaking volume of new listings received for the month of February,” says FVREB.

The Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) received 3,742 new listings in February, an increase of 75.3 per cent compared to January, and an increase of 14.6 per cent compared to February of last year. The previous highest February for new listings was 3,283 in 2016.

By month-end, February’s total active listings available for purchase were 3,790, a decrease of 8.0 per cent compared to the same month last year, however 62.5 per cent higher than what was available at the end of January. It’s the highest month-over-month increase in active listings in the Fraser Valley in 20 years.

“Although the market is still far from balanced, it is encouraging to see new listings increase again for the second month in a row,” said Fraser Valley Real Estate Board President, Larry Anderson. “We’re hopeful that this trend will be sustained leading into the spring season as more sellers come on stream to help soften the market and provide opportunities for the many buyers who’ve been sidelined over the past year and a half.”

“Buyers are looking for value for their real estate dollar and the Fraser Valley market still delivers compared to other regions throughout the Lower Mainland,” said Baldev Gill, CEO of the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board. “That said, supply fundamentals continue to be the number one issue facing real estate markets in all regions across the province. Until there is a concerted effort to address inventory, buyers will continue to face challenging market conditions.”

Fraser Valley February 2022 Market Update

To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Fraser Valley (which includes: Surrey, South Surrey, White Rock, North Delta, Cloverdale, Langley, Abbotsford, and Mission) CLICK HERE.



Curious how the market is doing in your city? Whether you're looking to buy, sell, or invest in Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Surrey, Langley, or Abbotsford, these Lower Mainland market update statistics will give you insight into the Vancouver and Fraser Valley real estate markets.

If you'd like more details about your specific market, please send us an email, we'd love to chat more. You can also fill out the Home Evaluation form here.
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By following monthly home maintenance checklists, you can save time and money down the road. It makes tasks more manageable and less daunting than doing them all at once.


These tasks can be done in March:


  • Check attic space for moisture
  • Clean humidifier(s)
  • Inspect & clean furnace
  • Check/replace furnace filters
  • Test smoke alarm & CO detectors, replace batteries
  • Inspect roof & exterior drainage
  • Prepare A/C for summer
  • Flush hot water & remove sediment
  • Clean garbage disposal
  • Clean ducts, vents & air intake
  • Clean dryer vent
  • Check/replace furnace filters
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Market Update for Metro & Greater Vancouver

“Low supply keeps upward pressure on home prices across Metro Vancouver’s housing market,” says REBGV.


Home sales came down in January 2022 from last year’s record-setting pace, while low supply continued to cause home prices to edge higher across Metro Vancouver.


The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 2,285 in January 2022, a 4.4 per cent decrease from the 2,389 sales recorded in January 2021, and a 15 per cent decrease from the 2,688 homes sold in December 2021.


“Our listing inventory on MLS® is less than half of what would be optimal to begin the year. As a result, hopeful home buyers have limited choice in the market today. This trend is causing fierce competition for a scarce number of homes for sale, which, in turn, increases prices,” Keith Stewart, REBGV economist said.


Market Update for Greater Vancouver

Metro Vancouver January 2022 Market Update

To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Metro Vancouver (which includes: Downtown, Westside, Eastside, North Vancouver, West Vancouver, Richmond, Tsawwassen, and Ladner) CLICK HERE.


Market Update for Greater Vancouver

Greater Vancouver Market Update January 2022


To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Greater Vancouver (which includes: Burnaby, New Westminster, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Pitt Meadows, and Maple Ridge) CLICK HERE.


Market Update for Fraser Valley

“Glimmer of hope for Fraser Valley home buyers as new listings surge in January,” says FVREB.


2021 was the busiest year in history for Fraser Valley real estate, and January activity saw the beginnings of a market rebalancing. Overall property sales—which are still the third highest ever for January—cooled compared to December, while the volume of new listings improved significantly.


The Fraser Valley Real Estate Board processed a total of 1,310 sales of all property types on its Multiple Listing Service® (MLS®) in January 2022, a decrease of 23.7 per cent compared to January 2021, and 27.5 per cent lower compared to December 2021.


“In January, REALTORS® saw the return of home sellers,” said Larry Anderson, President of the Board. “Yes, sales in our region remain elevated, but a positive, early trend for 2022 is we experienced a significant increase in requests from sellers to list.


“It’s early days yet, but if this trend continues into spring, we could see an easing of the supply-demand dynamic in our region. We have a long way to go to replenish our housing stock and bring much-needed balance to the market, but this is a step in the right direction.”


Fraser Valley Market Update January 2022


To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Fraser Valley (which includes: Surrey, South Surrey, White Rock, North Delta, Cloverdale, Langley, Abbotsford, and Mission) CLICK HERE.



Curious how the market is doing in your city? Whether you're looking to buy, sell, or invest in Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Surrey, Langley, or Abbotsford, these Lower Mainland market update statistics will give you insight into the Vancouver and Fraser Valley real estate markets.


If you'd like more details about your specific market, please send us an email, we'd love to chat more. You can also fill out the Home Evaluation form here.




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Feng shui is an ancient Chinese practice used to increase your prosperity and well-being. Feng shui is typically used directly in your environment—your home and work/office space—but can be applied to other practices like astrology and numerology to improve your qi or energy. To read more about feng shui, read our blog post Feng Shui for Beginners here.


You've probably heard of the personality test called Enneagram. Everybody has a personality type that coincides with a number between 1 and 9 depending on their characteristics and personality. Did you know there are also Energy Numbers? Like the Enneagram, each number is associated with common traits but Energy Numbers also incorporate directions ideal for success, health, relationships, and personal growth.


What Is a Feng Shui Kua Number?

The feng shui kua number is an energy number that coincides with your birthdate and gender. This number gives you insight and guidance on the best placement of furniture in your home or office for optimal energy flow, as well as in your personal life. 


How To Calculate Your Feng Shui Kua Number

Since feng shui is a Chinese system, kua numbers are calculated using the Chinese lunar calendar, meaning the year starts around the end of January or beginning of February, depending on the year. If your birthday is between January 1 and the start of the Lunar New Year for the year you were born, use the previous year as your birth year.


Gender also comes into play to calculate your kua number. Typically, you would use the gender assigned to you at birth, but you can also use the gender you identify with at the time of your calculation.


For Females:

  1. Add all 4 digits of your birth year

              Example 1: If you were born July 28, 1985 you would add 1 + 9 + 8 + 5 = 23

              Example 2: If you were born January 10, 1964 you would add 1 + 9 + 6 + 3 = 19

  1. If the sum is a 2-digit number, add it together again, and again is necessary, until you have a single digit

              Example 1: 2 + 3 = 5

              Example 2: 1 + 9 = 10, then 1 + 0 = 1

  1. Add 4 to that number

              Example 1: 5 + 4 = 9

              Example 2: 1 + 4 = 5

  1. If you have a 2-digit sum, add them together like you did in Step 2 until you have a single digit

  2. Your final single digit number is your kua number

              NOTE: If you’re female and you get a 5, your kua number is 8 (it is the same information and activations)


For Males:

  1. Add all 4 digits of your birth year

              Example 1: If you were born July 28, 1985 you would add 1 + 9 + 8 + 5 = 23

              Example 2: If you were born January 10, 1964 you would add 1 + 9 + 6 + 3 = 19

  1. If the sum is a 2-digit number, add it together again, and again is necessary, until you have a single digit

              Example 1: 2 + 3 = 5

              Example 2: 1 + 9 = 10, then 1 + 0 = 1

  1. Subtract that number from 11

              Example 1: 11 - 5 = 4

              Example 2: 11 - 1 = 10, then 1 + 0 = 1

  1. If you have a 2-digit sum, add them together like you did in Step 2 until you have a single digit

  2. Your final single digit number is your kua number

              NOTE: If you’re male and you get a 5, your kua number is 2 (it is the same information and activations)


If you need help calculating your energy number, please feel free to comment below or email me and I’ll help you.



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The Empty Homes Tax and the Vacancy Tax are similar in that they are both designed to turn empty homes into long-term housing for people who live and work in Vancouver. They also ensure foreign owners and those with primarily foreign income contribute fairly to British Columbia’s tax system.


Vancouver homeowners may be required to pay one or both taxes, so be sure to submit declarations for both the Empty Home Tax and the Vacancy Tax. Even if you live in your home, you must make these declarations every year.


EMPTY HOMES TAX (EHT)

How Does the Empty Homes Tax Work?

Vancouver residential homeowners are required to submit a declaration each year to determine if your property is subject to the Empty Homes Tax. If your property is deemed or declared empty in the 2021 reference year, it will be subject to a tax of 3% of the property’s 2021 assessed taxable value. 


Properties Not Subject to the Empty Homes Tax

Most properties will not be subject to the Empty Homes Tax, including those:

  • Used as a principal residence by the owner, their family member or friend, or other permitted occupier for at least six months of the year.

  • Rented for residential purposes for at least six months of the year, in periods of 30 or more consecutive days.

  • Meeting the criteria for one of the exemptions.


To read the exemptions and more FAQs regarding the Empty Homes Tax, go HERE.


How To Submit Your Empty Homes Tax Declaration

Only one declaration is required per property. For example: if you co-own a property, only one owner needs to declare.


If you fail to declare your home’s status by the deadline, your property will be deemed vacant and subject to the Empty Homes Tax of 3% of its assessed taxable value for the previous tax year, and a $250 by-law ticket.


You may give permission for someone else to submit your declaration on your behalf.


Declaration Timeline

  • Previous years' unpaid tax added to property tax bill: December 31, 2021

  • Declaration Deadline: February 2, 2022

  • Empty Homes Tax Payment for 2021 Deadline: April 14, 2022

 

What You Need to Submit Your Declaration 

 

VACANCY TAX

How Does the Vacancy Tax Work?

The Vacancy Tax is an annual tax based on how owners use residential properties in major urban areas in B.C. Like the Empty Homes Tax, homeowners are required to submit their Vacancy Tax declaration every year to declare their residency status and how their property has been used.


This annual tax is based on:

  • How property owners use their residential property

  • The property owner’s residency status

  • Where property owners earn and report their income

If a property has more than one owner, a separate declaration must be made for each owner, even if the other owner is your spouse or relative.


Because this tax is based on how each owner uses the property and whether they have foreign income, each owner on title needs to declare separately.


Most homes will not be subject to the tax as it does not apply to principal residences, homes that qualify for an exemption, or homes rented for at least six months of the year.


You need to declare your residency status, whether you pay taxes in Canada and how you use your property so that the government can determine:

 

Declaration Timeline

  • Receive your declaration letter mid-January to mid-February

  • Declare by March 31

  • If you owe tax, pay by the first business day in July

 

What You Need to Submit Your Declaration

  • Your your Letter ID and Declaration Code, which can be found at the top right corner of your letter

  • Go HERE to submit your declaration


The Vacancy Tax is different from Vancouver’s Empty Homes Tax and different rules apply for each one. This means that if you own residential property in the City of Vancouver, you:


  • Must declare separately for each tax

  • May be exempt from one tax but have to pay the other

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The long-awaited moment has come—your BC Property Assessment has arrived! We can picture it now: You’re holding the letter in your hands; with anticipation, you rip open the envelope. You pull out the paper and scan the writing until you find the dollar sign. Cue the gasp and wide eyes as you exclaim: “That’s what my home’s worth?!” 


The assessed value of your home is likely significantly higher than it was last year seeing as property values of BC Assessments in the Lower Mainland have increased an average of 20% from the year prior. We have even heard from some people that their assessment went up 47%! Alternatively, your value may have decreased or is lower than what you expected. Don’t fret!


Is that really the value of my home?

The short answer is no. It’s not. The main purpose of the BC Property Assessment is to determine how much municipal or provincial tax the government can get from you. These property appraisals are all done through an algorithm online. Appraisers don’t walk through every home and therefore they do not take into consideration renovations or interior layouts, etc. They base their assessments on a property’s location, size (of both the lot and the home), age, garages, and any add-ons made with permits.


Timing is also key. BC Property Assessments were done in July of the previous year. That’s six months’ worth of appreciation and other factors that aren’t reflected in the property value assessment. In many cases, as of January 2022, current values may already be hundreds of thousands of dollars higher than they were in July 2021, especially for homes over $900,000.


What actually determines the value of my home?

Unlike the BC Assessment, market value is determined in real-time and changes much more frequently depending on supply and demand. When your REALTOR® comes up with a price for your property, they take all of the following factors and more into consideration:


-Location and proximity to businesses, schools, restaurants, parks, etc.

-Lot size for detached homes

-Strata bylaws, contingency funds, etc. for condos and townhouses

-Interior layout, sizes, age and desirable features

-Upgrades and maintenance done to the home, especially more recently

-Recent comparable sales


That’s great, but what if I think my assessment is unfair or way off compared to my neighbour?

There are pros and cons to having a property assessment that’s either too high or too low for your property. Taxes are based on your assessment, so if it’s lower you can expect to pay lower taxes than other comparable homes in your area. On the other hand, if your assessment is much higher, you can use it to negotiate a better price when you sell. If neither of those scenarios suits you, you can always appeal your assessed value, but you have to do it before the deadline of January 31.


What could I put my house on the market for?

Regardless of what your property has been assessed for, there is no doubt that it is currently a Seller’s Market, which means you have the advantage. If you’re curious about what you could get for your home today, you can fill out the Home Evaluation form on my website by clicking here. We do a Comparative Market Analysis to evaluate the prices of properties similar to yours that have recently sold in your area. This analysis will give you a better idea of your property's market value, one of the first and essential steps as you prepare to sell your home. All it takes is less than a minute to complete and submit the form. Then, let us do the work for you! 


If you haven’t received your BC Property Assessment in the mail yet and are curious about your property value, you can search for your property online at www.bcassessment.ca.


Lower Mainland — Highlights

2022 Lower Mainland Highlights for BC Property Assessment

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There’s no denying that selling your home can be stressful and often emotional. It’s a big decision with huge financial implications. The to-do list for preparing your home and setting up the listing is long. So, how can you make the process easier on yourself with the best outcome? 


Start early.

 

If you know you want to sell your home in the coming months or within the year, there are steps you can take now to alleviate a lot of the stress that comes with putting your home on the market. 


First, find a REALTOR® that you trust. Someone who knows the Greater Vancouver or Fraser Valley real estate market inside and out and can give you accurate, honest information and advice throughout the process.


Then you can start getting your home ready to sell. This will involve decluttering and cleaning every nook and cranny to get the best possible photos to showcase your home and entice potential buyers to book showings. (Read THIS BLOG POST for more ideas on how to make your home more attractive to potential buyers.) You may also need to do some minor repairs including painting walls, replacing light bulbs, tightening door hinges, etc.


When the time comes to put your property on the market, you’ll be ready to sell.


Another tip to keep in mind is to think of yourself as a businessperson throughout the process, not a homeowner. Your home has a lot of sentimental value to you, but not your buyers. You’ve made memories and shared experiences with loved ones, but now it’s time to separate the nostalgia from the transaction if your goal is to get the highest price possible for your home.


If you’re entertaining the idea of selling your home and would like to find out what the value of your home is, or if you have any questions about the selling process, please send us an email or give us a call, we’d love to talk to you. We offer a free consultation so you can see if we’d be a good fit and the right REALTOR® for you.


Simply fill out the contact form HERE and I’ll be in touch with you shortly.
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Whether or not you're planning to sell your home in the near future or a bit further down the road, keeping these simple tips and ideas in mind now will help you wow potential buyers when the time comes.


Less is More

Keep it simple. Remove unnecessary furniture, decor, toys, and personal items from shelves and any open areas, even cupboards and closets. Think "minimalist." The more surface area buyers can see, the easier it is for them to envision their belongings in the space.



Clear surfaces

All surfaces should be cleared, including bathroom and kitchen counters, coffee tables, night stands, etc. Only items that fit the room's functionality—soap dispenser, espresso machine, etc.—could remain, if they blend into the decor of the room. No more than 3 items should be visible.



De-Personalize

Though your family photos are beautiful, potential buyers don't need to see them. An unpersonalized space is ideal for potential buyers to visualize themselves in your home. Add a few neutral prints to add a little something to the walls, but remove all photographs with people.



Minimize Storage

Potential buyers will open closets, cupboards, and pantries to see how much storage space there is, and how their items will fit in your space. Keep your storage items to a minimum so buyers can see the shelving space. Minimize your wardrobe to a few neutral pieces hanging on matching hangers and reduce the number of plates and cups in your kitchen cupboards to a set of 4. Don't forget about the fridge and freezer either—organize items to showcase the appliance.



Neutral colours

Neutral colours like grey, white, beige, black, etc.—keep a small space from looking too busy or overwhelming. Colour can be sparingly added in decor elements like pillows, throw blankets, vases, and prints.




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The Year in Review

Fueled by the consumer response to the COVID‐19 pandemic along with historically low interest rates, home sales hit a record high across the board in 2021! As the pandemic continues, many people remain working from home, meaning the need for housing is still a top priority for Vancouver and Fraser Valley residents. 


Market Update for Metro Vancouver

The Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV) reports that residential home sales in the region totalled 2,688 in December 2021, a 13.1 per cent decrease from the 3,093 sales recorded in December 2020, and a 21.6 per cent decrease from the 3,428 homes sold in November 2021.


The total number of homes currently listed for sale on the MLS® system in Metro Vancouver is 5,236, a 38.7 per cent decrease compared to December 2020 (8,538) and a 26.7 per cent decrease compared to November 2021 (7,144).


This is the lowest supply of homes on the market that Metro Vancouver has seen in over 30 years. With demand still at record-high levels, Vancouver residents can expect home prices to continue to grow until a more adequate supply of homes is available.


Metro Vancouver December 2021 Market Update

To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Metro Vancouver (which includes: Downtown, Westside, Eastside, North Vancouver, West Vancouver, Richmond, Tsawwassen, and Ladner) CLICK HERE.


Market Update for Greater Vancouver

Greater Vancouver Market Update December 2021

To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Greater Vancouver (which includes: Burnaby, New Westminster, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Pitt Meadows, and Maple Ridge) CLICK HERE.


December Market Update for Fraser Valley

In December, Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) processed 1,808 sales, second only to December 2020’s record‐setting 2,086 sales. New listings in December were 1,278. By month’s end, active inventory finished at 1,957 units, 60 per cent below the 10‐year average, and the lowest in 41 years.


Despite the decrease in supply, single-family, townhouse, and condo sale prices continued to increase in December. But, like Metro Vancouver, with demand still at record-high levels, Fraser Valley residents can expect home prices to continue to grow until a more adequate supply of homes is available.


Fraser Valley Market Update December 2021

To view the year-to-date and historic statistics for Fraser Valley (which includes: Surrey, South Surrey, White Rock, North Delta, Cloverdale, Langley, Abbotsford, and Mission) CLICK HERE.




Curious how the market is doing in your city? Whether you're looking to buy, sell, or invest in Vancouver, Burnaby, New Westminster, Coquitlam, Port Coquitlam, Port Moody, Surrey, Langley, or Abbotsford, these Lower Mainland market update statistics will give you insight into the Vancouver and Fraser Valley real estate markets.


If you'd like more details about your specific market, please send us an email, we'd love to chat more. You can also fill out the Home Evaluation form here.


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The data relating to real estate on this website comes in part from the MLS® Reciprocity program of either the Real Estate Board of Greater Vancouver (REBGV), the Fraser Valley Real Estate Board (FVREB) or the Chilliwack and District Real Estate Board (CADREB). Real estate listings held by participating real estate firms are marked with the MLS® logo and detailed information about the listing includes the name of the listing agent. This representation is based in whole or part on data generated by either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB which assumes no responsibility for its accuracy. The materials contained on this page may not be reproduced without the express written consent of either the REBGV, the FVREB or the CADREB.